Training Providers

We are calling for volunteers to become our Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) for the Test Item Development Project! Please fill out the application below and submit it by March 27, 2017. 4-core-chi-logos

CCHI conducted its second national Job Task Analysis (JTA) of the healthcare interpreters in 2016. That national survey was completed by over 2,000 interpreters, trainers and supervisors/managers. The results from this survey (click here to read the JTA Report of 2016) led to the creation of the new certification examinations blueprint (click here to see the 2017 CCHI Test Content Outline).

It’s time to develop NEW items for our exams! And the first step is to convene several panels of volunteer Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) who will write new test items, review, and validate them over the next 4-6 months. CCHI will provide all the necessary orientation and training via conference calls and online collaboration tools. All tasks will also be performed via remote tools.

 

Who should apply?

Our goal is to convene several diverse and representative panels of SMEs - item writers and item reviewers. It is important that panelists for the panels to represent our profession in a comprehensive manner. For this reason, we are looking for volunteers who are:

  • Interpreters who have CoreCHI™ or CHI™ certifications (this requirement is mandatory for practicing interpreters),
  • Interpreter managers and supervisors working in healthcare settings,
  • Interpreter educators and trainers,
  • Certified translators with healthcare/medical areas of expertise.

 

What are your commitments (if selected)?

  1. Sign CCHI’s Confidentiality and Content Security Agreements. (Review our SME Participation Policies prior to applying.)
  2. Be available for prompt discussion via email or online collaboration tools for the duration of the project, which is between April 3 - October 30, 2017.
  3. Be available for the first first 2-hour orientation conference call on April 5, 6 or 7, 2017. Depending on which panel you are selected for (CoreCHI™ exam or CHI™ exam), you will be given a choice of the time slots at 10 am EST or at 7 pm EST on these days. Please apply only if you can participate in a call at one of these time slots on these dates.
  4. Be able to complete the online item writer/reviewer preparation module between April 7-12, 2017.
  5. Be available for 3-4 two-hour conference calls during the project.
  6. Be able to write or review test items independently and in collaboration with three other SMEs (via email/online tools) in the following time periods:
    • Item writers for the CoreCHI™ exam - between April 3 – May 3, 2017
    • Item reviewers the CoreCHI™ exam - between May 4 – June 4, 2017
    • Item writers for the CHI™ exam (English) - between April 3 – May 3, 2017
    • Item reviewers the CHI™ exam (English) - between May 4 – May 21, 2017.
    • Item reviewers the CHI™ exam (Spanish, Arabic, Mandarin) - between May 22 – July 30, 2017.
    • By mutual agreement and availability, SMEs will be engaged in other test development activities in June – October 30, 2017.

This is a volunteer project. CCHI will not pay any honorarium for participation in this project. However, CCHI will grant 2 CE hours for participation in the online training.

 

How to apply?

Click here to download CCHI's SME Application in MS Word format.

Please fill it out completely, and to submit, email the application, together with your current full resume, to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 03/27/17. Only electronically submitted, complete applications will be considered. You will be notified if you are selected to participate in this project by March 31, 2017.

If you have any questions about this project or about the SME application, contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Thank you for your interest and support!

©2017, CCHI

 

As part of CCHI’s support of interpreter continuing education, here is the second in our series of articles about self-assessment for continuous improvement.

Our guest author is Amber Franklin, Assistant Professor in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at Miami University in Ohio. Dr. Franklin holds a PhD in Speech and Hearing Sciences from the University of Washington. She conducts research in the areas of accent modification and listener responses to accented speech. Her passion for successful communication across varieties of English was shaped by her upbringing in the linguistic mosaic of Toronto, Canada.

Concept and contribution by: Linda Golley, CCHI Commissioner.

 

Amber D. Franklin, Ph.D., CCC-SLP:

 

Medical interpreters exist in order to effectively transfer the meaning of what patients and care teams say to each other across language barriers. If the interpreter correctly conveys the meaning of the message, but cannot be understood because of his poor intelligibility, he is not performing to the required standard. Intelligibility is defined as the extent to which a speaker is understood by a naïve listener. Sometimes, a very strong foreign accent result in reduced intelligibility and sub-optimal communicative performance.

Yet, any explicit discussion of accent has almost been politically taboo in medical interpreter circles until just recently. In many instances, English-speaking health workers have chosen not to challenge interpreters whose English they could not understand, out of reluctance to appear patronizing. They have focused on getting the interpreter to convey their words to the patient, and have given up on trying to fully understand what the interpreter is saying to them from the patient’s side.

As medical interpreters professionalize, there is a higher expectation from care teams that interpreters will be fully proficient in speaking clear English, both in terms of having good grammar and vocabulary AND in terms of being easy to understand.

CCHI encourages and invites healthcare interpreters to evaluate their own accents. Self-evaluation can be a helpful first-step in understanding how one’s accent may affect speech intelligibility.

Most non-native speakers of English have some difficulty pronouncing specific English speech sounds. For example, many languages do not have the English short I sound in words like “live” and “sit.” As a result, many non-native speakers of English incorrectly produce the more familiar long I sound instead of the short I. As a result, the word “live” sound like “leave” and the word “sit” sound like “seat.” This error may seem minor at first. However, imagine what a difference that little vowel makes when you consider the following two sentences: “The doctor said he is going to live” and “The doctor said he is going to leave.”

Incorrect pronunciation also affects the emphasis that certain syllables get within a word and the emphasis that certain words receive within a sentence. In English, many nouns and verbs are spelled the same way but differ based on the placement of syllable stress. For example, the word “compress” as a noun requires stress to be places on the first syllable, “COMpress.” However, the word “compress” as a verb, requires stress to be placed on the second syllable “comPRESS.” Correct placement of syllable and word stress is vital in medical interpretation because these factors cue the listener to meaning.

 

glossary400

We, interpreters, love words and, yet, never seem to have enough time for an in-depth research. Wouldn’t it be great if right before an appointment we can grab a brief, reliable, user-friendly bilingual glossary that has words, terms and phrases most frequently used by providers and patients at that type of an appointment?!

This is how the idea of medical mini-glossaries was born. Our volunteer Lois Feuerle and the two Commissioners, Virginia Perez-Santalla and Karin Ruschke, spearheaded this project. Yet, it’s up to interpreters like you to create the English mini-glossaries and translate them into as many languages as possible.

During the first phase of the project, the CCHI Mini-Glossaries will consist of 50-101 words and terms. They’ll be organized thematically around an appointment type, in a logical sequence rather than alphabetically.

 

We do need your help to make this project thrive! Please send us (to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) your suggestions about:

  • translating the existing mini-glossaries into your language (attachments are accepted; let us know what font you use),
  • adding new terms to the existing mini-glossaries (remember, the maximum is 101),
  • better translation or another translation of any term listed in any existing mini-glossary,
  • which appointment-type we should create a glossary for, etc.

We are also looking for volunteers of different languages to form language-specific Terminology Committees for this project. If you are interested, please sign up online at http://www.cchicertification.org/get-involved/get-involved and specify “Mini-Glossaries Project” in the appropriate field.

 

English

1.  Cardiovascular System

Download the pdf

Download the MS Word

2.  ENT - Ear

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

3. Respiratory System

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

4. Affordable Care Act - Insurance terms

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

5. Gallbladder

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

6. General Consent (Sight Translation)

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

7. MRI Intake Forms (Sight Translation)

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

 

Arabic

1.  Cardiovascular System

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

2.  ENT - Ear

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

3. Respiratory System

Download the pdf

Download the MS Word

4. Affordable Care Act - Insurance terms

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

 

Mandarin

1.  Cardiovascular System

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

2.  ENT - Ear

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

3. Respiratory System

Download the pdf

Download the MS Word

4. Affordable Care Act - Insurance terms

Download the pdf

Download the MS Word

5. Gallbladder

Download the pdf

Download the MS Word (Simplified)Download the MS Word (Traditional)

 

Portuguese

1. Cardiovascular System

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

2. ENT-Ear

 

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

 

3. Respiratory System

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

 

Russian

1. Cardiovascular System

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

2. ENT-Ear

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

3. Respiratory System

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

 

Serbian

1.  Cardiovascular System

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

 

Spanish

1.  Cardiovascular System

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

2. ENT-Ear

 

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

3. Respiratory System

 

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

4. Affordable Care Act - Insurance terms

 

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

5. Gallbladder

 

Download the pdf file

Download the MS Word file

 

Ensure you are prepared for your exams with these helpful study tips!

Email us your study tips to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and we'll include them in the next editions.
 

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Download our Study Checklist

 

Study Tips for the CoreCHI™ exam

Download the CoreCHI™ Exam Study Tips here.

 

 

Other helpful links

Visit our Certification Resources page for other helpful links.